From The Blog


You already know that vegetables are good for your health. But did you know that they are also good for your mood?

A new study led by researchers in New Zealand and published in the British Journal of Healthy Psychology found that eating fruits and vegetables is associated with greater flourishing in daily life.

The study tracked 405 young adults for 13 days, and found that participants who ate more fruits and vegetables reported higher levels of happiness, curiosity, and creativity.

Even more remarkably, participants tended to score higher on all of those measures on the specific days on which they ate the most fruits and vegetables.

Originally published on Resource Insights (ResourceInsights.Blogspot.com) by Kurt Cobb. Click here to view the original.

If you are dead, you cannot mount a comeback. If all life on Earth were destroyed by, say, a large comet impact, there would be no revival. Ruin is forever.

The destruction of all life on Earth is not 10 times worse than the destruction of one-tenth of all life on Earth. It is infinitely worse. A fall of 1 foot is not one-tenth as damaging to the human body as a fall of 10 feet, nor is it one-hundredth as damaging as a fall of 100 feet (which is very likely to be lethal). Walking down a stairway with one-foot-high steps, we are typically immune to any damage at all. Thus, we can say in both instances above that the harm rises dramatically (nonlinearly) as we move toward any 100 percent lethal limit.

It is just these properties–scope and severity–that most humans seem blind to when introducing innovations into society and the environment according to a recent paper entitled “The Precautionary Principle: Fragility and Black Swans from Policy Actions.” The paper comes from the Extreme Risk Initiative at the New York University School of Engineering and one of its authors, Nassim Nicholas Taleb, is well-known to my readers.

The concepts in the paper are applicable to systemic problems such as climate change. But the paper addresses only two specific issues, genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and nuclear power, to illustrate its main points.

The precautionary principle refers to a policy that demands proof that an innovation in not broadly harmful to humans or the environment before it is deployed. We are referring here to public policy issues, not decisions by individuals. The question the paper tries to answer is: When should this principle be invoked in public policy?

The answer the authors give is surprisingly simple: when the risk of ruin is systemic. That doesn’t mean that they suggest no steps to mitigate risk when ruin might only be local, say, the explosion of a fireworks factory. But, they feel that such an event falls within the realm of risk management. An explosion at one fireworks factory cannot set off a chain reaction around the world. Individuals in and around the plant might be ruined. But all of humanity would not ruined.

Originally published on GMeducation.org by Lawrence Woodward. Click here to view the original.

(6th July 2014) A report by the Ministry of Health in Córdoba, Argentina reveals that deaths from cancerous tumours are double the national average in areas where genetically engineered crops are grown and agro-chemicals are used.

This comprehensive report documented five years of information on cancer cases in the province.

It provides more evidence that, far from being the miracle it is claimed to be, industrial, GMO driven cropping is turning into a public health hell.

The highest rate of death occurs in the “pampa gringa” area, where most GMO crops are grown and most agrochemicals are used.